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Bristol Bay, Alaska Paul Colangelo / WWF-US
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Say NO to the Pebble Mine

The Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska is the wrong mine in the wrong place. Alaskans who depend on a healthy Bristol Bay for their livelihoods and way of life have been emphatic on that point.

The Pebble Mine—which is set to be constructed at the headwaters of two of Bristol Bay's most productive salmon producing river systems—threatens a region that depends on clean water and intact ecosystems to support its iconic wildlife, 14,000+ seafood industry jobs, a world-class sport fishing sector, unmatched tourism opportunities, and vibrant local cultures.

We cannot let the Pebble Mine happen. This has been a decade-long battle and in the last five years alone, more than half a million Americans have joined WWF in urging the US government to stop the Pebble Mine from moving forward. We cannot stop our fight to protect Bristol Bay, Alaska.

Add your name to the petition we'll be hand-delivering to members of Congress and help us tell elected officials NO to the Pebble Mine.

Dear Congress:

Please reject the highly flawed Environmental Impact Statement and say NO to Pebble Mine.

Building a big mine upstream has real potential to impact everything downstream. And what’s downstream from the proposed Pebble Mine is everything that makes up Bristol Bay. There has been bi-partisan, diverse community-led opposition to the Pebble Mine project for two decades.

Still, developers want to dig a mine one-mile-wide and quarter-mile deep. Carving out Pebble Mine would lead to the destruction of 3,000 acres of wetlands and more than 21 miles of salmon streams. The scar on Alaska’s pristine, productive environment would be visible from space.

Bristol Bay boasts the world's largest wild salmon fishery. But what that really means is the region is home to an abundance of biodiversity. In an age of climate change and pressure to develop, it’s vital we protect these wild places.

Locals and visitors regularly spot beluga whales, humpback whales, caribou, brown bears, and moose, not to mention trees, flowers and plants of all types. Native communities rely on the harvest of salmon and other wild species for most of the protein consumed each year. Pebble Mine exposes the entire biome and the people who depend on it to a potentially toxic, uncertain future.

I urge you to say NO to Pebble Mine.

[Your Name]

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Say NO to the Pebble Mine

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